How We Brew Everything We Brew

 



Did you know that all of our recipes are open source and available on our website?

That's right: click here or search for your favorite Groennfell or Havoc brew in the search bar and you'll be able to find the homebrew recipe. Are we missing one you're craving? Shoot us a message at info@groennfell.com and we'll post it as soon as we can!

Generally speaking, all of our meads are brewed in a very similar fashion. So, we thought we’d give you our techniques all in one place before inundating you with recipes.

Big disclaimer: These are our practices, we are not claiming that they are necessarily the best practices.

With that out of the way, here are all of our general principles in one place:

  • Our honey is never heated above 105 degrees Fahrenheit, and usually only to 94F. This prevents the volatilization of complex flavor and aroma compounds.
  • Our brewing water, for similar reasons, is never heated above 98F.
  • We filter our water with a carbon filter to remove off-flavors and to give ourselves a stable starting point throughout the year. This prevents our having to worry about changing aquifers, treatments, and other issues.
  • With the exception of our darker meads, all of our honey is raw (or strained) wildflower honey from Canada.
  • With the exception of a few wild-fermented meads, we sulfite the must (the honey water combination) to kill or suppress wild yeast and bacteria. For more on that discussion, please check out Them’s Fightin’ Words
  • We never filter our products because we believe subtle flavor and aroma is much more important than clarity.
  • Fruit juices are almost always added in primary fermentation with the exception of citrus juices which are added in secondary.
  • All spices and herbs are added in secondary.
  • We only sulfite and sorbate post fermentation if a sugar-bearing ingredient is added such as orange juice, maple syrup, or raisins. This prevents refermentation and exploding cans.
  • We are careful to brew our meads with an original gravity such that we can add ingredients in the secondary and still hit our intended ABV. (Specifics for each recipe will be included.)
  • We force carbonate all of our products because many of our yeast strains produce hydrogen sulfide in a quantity that would render the packaged product… a little eggy.
  • We oxygenate the ever-loving heck out of all of our products pre-fermentation, then we are very careful not to introduce oxygen at any later stage.

We know that’s an awful lot, but we’ll have reminders in each recipe. We hope this is helpful!

Once again, you can find all homebrew recipes over here.

Not interested in carboys or autosiphons? Just want your mead to appear on your doorstep one day? Check out our Build Your Own Mead Case. It gets you everything you want with no reracking or honey spills!

1 comment

When I had a bottle of mead delivered to me it was hot. It being the summer why don’t you guys put the bottles in Styrofoam containers instead of the cardboard ones. They would have better heat protection as well as durability.

Don W Medaris

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